Sun, Surf and Street Art: A Visit to Coney Art Walls



Coney Island is a destination whose season bookends the New York City summer. While there are the requisite roller coaster rides and bumper cars, it’s so much more than an amusement park. It’s home to the New York Aquarium and the Coney Island Circus Sideshow. There’s the beach and the boardwalk. Fireworks on Friday night. And let’s not forget legendary annual events like the Mermaid Parade and the Coney Island Film Festival. Countless memories are made here.

And it’s for this very reason that Joseph J. Sitt brought Coney Art Walls to life. The President & CEO of Thor Equities felt Coney Island had lost some of the shine he remembered from his youth, and he wanted to help bring it back.



Coney Art Walls Street Art Coney Island - Mad Hatters NYC Blog
Artist: Marie Roberts
Coney Art Walls Street Art Coney Island - Mad Hatters NYC Blog
Artist: D*Face


Artist: Crash

Coney Art Walls Street Art Coney Island - Mad Hatters NYC Blog
Work in progress, Artist: Alexis Diaz
Coney Art Walls Street Art Coney Island - Mad Hatters NYC Blog
Artist: Nychos

Coney Art Walls is an outdoor street art museum that features many incredible talents like Nychos and D*Face. Instead of painting murals on a building, the artists get to display their work on freestanding walls placed throughout the space located between Surf Avenue and the boardwalk. Shipping containers house food vendors, so visitors are free to enjoy quick bites while surrounded by some of the most amazing contemporary art. New pieces have been added each season since its inauguration in 2015, and they mingle with ones from prior years. The unmistakable Coney Island Parachute Jump and other roller coaster rides provide a unique backdrop for the outdoor gallery.



Coney Art Walls Street Art Coney Island - Mad Hatters NYC Blog
Artist: The London Police
Coney Art Walls Street Art Coney Island - Mad Hatters NYC Blog
Artist: Miss Van
Coney Art Walls Street Art Coney Island - Mad Hatters NYC Blog
When retro beauties present themselves, you photograph them! Artist: Eine
Coney Art Walls Street Art Coney Island - Mad Hatters NYC Blog
Artists: Icy & Sot
Coney Art Walls Street Art Coney Island - Mad Hatters NYC Blog
Artist: Chris Stain



Coney Art Walls is part of our summer series dedicated to celebrating street art in New York City. In case you missed it, be sure to check out earlier posts in the series which include:

Bushwick Collective Ultimate Street Art Destination New York City - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Chasing Rainbows at the Bushwick Collective: The Ultimate Street Art Destination in New York City

Street Art Mural Party New York City- Mad Hatters NYC Blog

It’s My Party And I’ll Paint If I Want To: A Street Art Mural Party in New York City

As a reminder: The best way to get to Coney Island is always using the subway. This is, in fact, one of those cases where your subway fare is a steal! Take the D, F, N or Q subway to Stillwell Avenue, which puts you right in the heart of the action. Just build in a little bit of time for the travel, it takes approximately 45-60 minutes to get there from Manhattan.

Any street art lover will not regret traveling out here to experience the amazing public art space, which has found a home in a classic New York summer destination.

Location:
3050 Stillwell Avenue

Hours:
Daily 12 pm – 10 pm



Pair it with:

A hot dog from Nathan’s Famous

Coney Art Walls Street Art Coney Island - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Coney Art Walls Street Art Coney Island - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Coney Art Walls Street Art Coney Island - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

There’s a certain mystique to the original Nathan’s Famous near Stillwell Avenue in Coney Island. Forget, for a moment, that over its legendary 100-year history it has survived Prohibition, founding family squabbles and damage from Hurricane Sandy. Disregard the fact that the neon signs are the originals from the 20’s or that it holds one of the oldest post-Prohibition beer licenses in New York. Ignore the anecdotes about the famous names attached to it, like Al Capone, FDR and Frank Sinatra. Pooh-pooh the annual July 4th International Hot Dog Eating Contest. Sure, that’s fascinating, but it’s all just noise.

Focus instead on what truly makes it special and quintessentially New York: the all beef frankfurter in natural casing. A dog in a roll. Simple. Don’t add a bunch of garbage. Just meat and bread.

Many New Yorkers will swear that even though you can get Nathan’s hot dogs all over the city and in your grocery store, the ones at the original Coney Island location taste better. There’s no science to it, but we’re inclined to agree.

Location:
3050 Stillwell Avenue

Hours:
Sun-Thu  9 am – 11 pm
Fri-Sat  9 am – 12 am

– L. & J.

 

It’s My Party And I’ll Paint If I Want To: A Street Art Mural Party in New York City



Summer in New York City is more of a feeling than a season. Even though temperatures fluctuate wildly, everyone wants to be outside. That makes it a great time for one of our favorite activities: hunting down street art. We’ve decided to do a small series of posts on it here on the blog, which we kicked off last week with our post on the Bushwick Collective.

What’s unique about the Bushwick Collective is that there’s an active curator who obtains the necessary permits and blessings. But elsewhere, most street artists still operate under the cloak of darkness. Illegal pieces are tucked into corners and slapped onto doors. And just as quickly, they can get painted over or removed.



Street Art Mural Party New York City- Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Street Art Mural Party New York City- Mad Hatters NYC Blog

In Alphabet City, we recently attended a mural party organized by Robert Galinsky. As an active member of the neighborhood, Robert observed that bare walls invited less desirable tagging. So even though the activity isn’t officially sanctioned, he’s taken it upon himself to curate the walls of the city-owned building he manages. On this particular occasion, he invited three artists to contribute: Funqest, SacSix and XORS. He doesn’t offer them compensation, just a space to display their craft.



Street Art Mural Party New York City- Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Street Art Mural Party New York City- Mad Hatters NYC Blog

A post shared by FUNQEST (@funqest) on

Funqest is an artist of Japanese heritage with a distinct, dynamic style. His recent murals are largely abstract faces built with colorful blocks and dark borders. But a quick visit to his website shows a large breadth of work beginning in 2013. Funqest dons a Japanese Gigaku mask to hide his identity. He works in tandem with a partner, who helps him execute his vision.

Street Art Mural Party New York City- Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Street Art Mural Party New York City- Mad Hatters NYC Blog

A post shared by @sacsix on

SacSix has long been a fan of street art, but only became an active participant less than two years ago. But even within that short period he managed to capture a coveted commission for the 2016 MTV Music Awards. His wheatpaste pieces feature icons of pop culture…. and Mr. Poop. Mr. Poop is a pigeon with a recurring guest star role in many of his pieces. The “Be Great” wall is SacSix’s largest outdoor work to date, and it features notable women of color.



Street Art Mural Party New York City- Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Street Art Mural Party New York City- Mad Hatters NYC Blog

A post shared by Renee Snelson (@reneexors) on

Renee Snelson, who works under the name XORS, creates hyper-exaggerated images of shoes. But the shoes aren’t just there to promote a Carrie Bradshaw-level obsession (she’s also a talented shoe designer). The images of stilettos and high-heeled boots also speak to the darker side of fashion and the struggles women have with self-image.

Robert hand-selected the artists to blanket the block with vibrant hues, just in time for the summer. But if you happen to walk by, you may notice the new art has gone up around a couple of older pieces. One is a tribute to musician Gil Scott-Heron which locals are particularly fond of. The other, a simple wall by artist Chico that reads “Peace L.E.S”, was painted a week after 9/11. The old and the new capture the spirit of the neighborhood perfectly.

Location:
E 12th St and Ave C



Pair it with:

A meal at Superiority Burger

Street Art Mural Party New York City- Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Street Art Mural Party New York City- Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Most people find the term veggie burger to be an oxymoron, but I’ll confess that I’m a fan. It’s a great avenue for creativity, and I’ve come across some very interesting varieties in my foodscapades. But if Justin doesn’t need to follow up a veggie burger with a “real burger”, then I know we’ve stumbled upon something good.

When Brooks Headley left Del Posto to open Superiority Burger, it caused quite a stir. He started with a pop-up, then opened his East Village joint. Lines snaked down the block, no matter the weather. Waits have eased up a little, but the vegetarian fare is still really good. Justin particularly enjoys their version of a Sloppy Joe, and the burnt broccoli side is a favorite. Give it a shot, we have a feeling you won’t miss the meat.

Location:
430 E 9th St

Hours:
Wed-Mon: 11:30 am – 10:00 pm
Closed Tuesday

– L.

Chasing Rainbows at the Bushwick Collective: The Ultimate Street Art Destination in New York City



If you’re a fan of street art, then you’re in luck.  There’s no shortage of it here in New York City, and all you have to do is keep your eyes open.  (Judging by how regularly people bump into me on a sidewalk, this doesn’t seem to be as regular a practice as you might think.)  Thanks to its temporary nature, graffiti is both a literal and figurative fresh coat of paint — blanketing the city with different images, styles and personalities on a regular basis.  

Searching for street art in the city is a fun pastime of ours.  We’re fortunate that New York City attracts worldwide talents who turn our streets and alleys into art galleries.  While there are treasures to be discovered all over the city, fanatics can get a huge payoff by visiting one of the most well-known hubs where street artists go to create and collaborate: the Bushwick Collective.

Bushwick Collective Ultimate Street Art Destination New York City - Mad Hatters NYC Blog
Artist: Chor Boogie
Bushwick Collective Ultimate Street Art Destination New York City - Mad Hatters NYC Blog
Artist: FKDL



Bushwick Collective Ultimate Street Art Destination New York City - Mad Hatters NYC Blog
Artist: Phetus88

Bushwick Collective Ultimate Street Art Destination New York City - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Bushwick is a neighborhood in Brooklyn that is easily accessible via the L Train.  A trip to Bushwick takes less than a half hour from Union Square, so a quick jaunt from Manhattan is entirely manageable.  It’s open year-round, so all you need to do is dress for the weather and bring a camera.

The Bushwick Collective is a non-profit group founded in 2012 by native Joe Ficalora, who still curates the walls in the area.  It was the natural heir to graffiti mecca 5 Pointz which fell victim to gentrification.  At the Bushwick Collective, artists submit recent work, bios and concepts for review and are awarded precious space for their ideas to come to life.  

Bushwick Collective Ultimate Street Art Destination New York City - Mad Hatters NYC Blog
Artist: Louis Masai
Bushwick Collective Ultimate Street Art Destination New York City - Mad Hatters NYC Blog
Artist: Oji



Bushwick Collective Ultimate Street Art Destination New York City - Mad Hatters NYC Blog
Artists: Joe Iurato and Logan Hicks
Bushwick Collective Ultimate Street Art Destination New York City - Mad Hatters NYC Blog
Artist: Adam Fujita

A broad range of artists are represented at the Bushwick Collective. You’ll find the work of Brazilian artist Sipros and Chilean artist Dasic Fernandez.  You’ll find the distinctive signature of Austrian artist Nychos.  British pop art murals by DFace will catch your eye.  But the walls aren’t simply decorative: many contain social and political messages of our times.  Take, for example, London-based Louis Masai’s “The Art of Beeing” series, which seeks to bring attention to endangered species.  Or consider the work of Adam Fujita AKA AdamFu AKA Atoms, the creative force behind the graffiti podcast My Life in Letters. His pieces are often topical, and have included political issues like national security and impeachment.

Bushwick Collective Ultimate Street Art Destination New York City - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Bushwick Collective Ultimate Street Art Destination New York City - Mad Hatters NYC Blog
Artist: Don Rimx



Bushwick Collective Ultimate Street Art Destination New York City - Mad Hatters NYC Blog
Artist: Gustavo Gutti Barrios
Bushwick Collective Ultimate Street Art Destination New York City - Mad Hatters NYC Blog
Artist: Straker

The Bushwick Collective recently held its annual block party, which provides the masses an opportunity to actually see some of the artists at work.  Food trucks line the streets, musical acts take the stage, and there is art at every turn.  It’s a fun event for those interested in a big, lively outdoor party.  (Follow their Facebook page for updates.) But be forewarned: it can get a little rowdy.  If you’re more interested in photographing the art you’re better off coming on a different day, when there aren’t as many people around.

Location:
Troutman St at Saint Nicholas Ave



Pair it with:

For large groups: Tutu’s

Bushwick Collective Ultimate Street Art Destination New York City - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Bushwick Collective Ultimate Street Art Destination New York City - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Bushwick Collective Ultimate Street Art Destination New York City - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Roberta’s is Bushwick’s most famous resident and it’s a lovely place, but there’s usually a wait.  Tutu’s is a quaint little place nearby.  Thanks to picnic table seating in the back room, it accommodates large groups nicely.  Tutu’s is the definition of casual dining, with a nice selection of burgers.  Time generally moves more slowly in Bushwick, so don’t expect super speedy service.  On the plus side, that means you won’t feel rushed out the door either.  Settle in and make a night of it.

Location:
25 Bogart St

Hours:
Sun-Thu: 11:00 am -1:00 am
Fri-Sat: 11:00 am – 4:00 am



If there are just a few of you: Arepera Guacuco

Bushwick Collective Ultimate Street Art Destination New York City - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Bushwick Collective Ultimate Street Art Destination New York City - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Bushwick Collective Ultimate Street Art Destination New York City - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

This Venezuelan arepa joint has a bustling open kitchen that appears to work as rhythmically as the loud music blaring over its speakers.  There are a number of creative arepas on the menu, including a vegetarian and vegan option.  The Pabellon, which has shredded beef, cheese, sweet plantains and black beans is sublime.  The Mariscada, a tomato-based seafood stew with an arepa on the side for dipping, is also an excellent choice.  And don’t miss the popular cocada, a delightfully refreshing coconut milkshake.

Location:
44 Irving Ave

Hours:
Mon-Thu: 12:00 pm – 10:30 pm
Fri: 12:00 pm – 11:30 pm
Sat:11:00 am – 11:30 pm
Sun: 11:00 am – 10:30 pm

– L.

 

A Marriage of Tradition and Modernity: Yoshitomo Nara’s Thinker at Pace Gallery



We’re big fans of the Ramones, so we excitedly trekked out to the Queens Museum last year for the Hey! Ho! Let’s Go!: Ramones and the Birth of Punk exhibit.  (That post can be found here.)  As expected, we found a bounty of fantastic memorabilia on display.  But the exhibit also included amazing art from the likes of Sergio Aragones and Shepard Fairey.  In fact, this little gem graced the entrance:

Yoshitomo Nara Thinker Pace Gallery - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

The piece was commissioned specifically for the exhibit and featured a familiar character from Japanese artist Yoshitomo Nara’s work.  Ramona is named in homage to the band, which the artist is an unabashed fan of.  We became familiar with some of Yoshitomo Nara’s work on a visit to MOCA in Los Angeles many years ago, but only came to learn of this link at the exhibit.  Perhaps I shouldn’t have been so surprised: the Ramones enjoyed wide success in Japan.  

Yoshitomo Nara is considered part of the Japanese Neo-Pop movement, which combines elements of Japanese culture with the Western influence that flooded the country as it rapidly modernized.  His contemporary, Takashi Murakami (who we’re also fans of) coined the term “Superflat” to describe the aesthetic.  Superflat referred not only to the traditional flatness of Japanese drawing, but to the merger of art and commerce into a single layer.  



Yoshitomo Nara Thinker Pace Gallery - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Yoshitomo Nara Thinker Pace Gallery - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Yoshitomo Nara has been open about his childhood and being a latchkey kid, and how he was often left to his own devices.  His pieces appear confined in that space and time, a reflection of what a young Japanese boy obsessed with manga and punk music might produce.  His young female subjects accessorize with knives and guitars instead of lace and glitter.



Yoshitomo Nara Thinker Pace Gallery - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Yoshitomo Nara Thinker Pace Gallery - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

His latest exhibit is now on display at the Pace Gallery in Chelsea.  Thinker takes his work in a slightly different direction.  The childlike figures are still present, but they also take the form of “forest spirits”.  The forest spirits add an otherworldly component to the exhibit.  There is also a collection of jars, which again combines​ the more traditional art of ceramics with his contemporary images and sayings.  Perhaps this how Yoshitomo Nara approaches spirituality as he matures.

Thinker is on display through April 29.

Location:
510 West 25th St

Hours:
Tues-Sat 10 am – 6 pm



Pair it with:

A meal at Harold’s Meat + Three

Yoshitomo Nara Thinker Pace Gallery - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Yoshitomo Nara Thinker Pace Gallery - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Yoshitomo Nara Thinker Pace Gallery - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Chef Harold Moore wanted to offer a staple of Southern cuisine: the “Meat and Three”.  Perhaps the name gives it away, but in these restaurants diners select one meat and three sides.  But Chef Harold grew up in Northern New Jersey and has worked for both Daniel and Jean-Georges.  So what do you get when you marry a traditional staple with elite culinary training?  You get Harold’s Meat and Three, located in the spiffy Arlo Hudson Square Hotel.  

The restaurant achieves its intended juxtaposition.  The space itself is not similar to any New York City eatery.  First of all, it’s really, really big.  There’s lots of elbow room, which means you won’t “accidentally overhear” conversations.  And you won’t find the Hanger Steak and Eggs on any menu in the south.  The entrees are well executed, but the sides can be tricky.  We loved the Coleslaw and Cucumber Salad, but the Grits and the Crushed Cauliflower were excessively buttery.

Location:
2 Renwick St

Hours:
Sun-Thu 7 am – 11 pm
Fri-Sat 7 am – 11:30 pm

– L.

It’s a Small World After All: A Visit to Gulliver’s Gate



I’m not sure if you can tell from the pictures we’ve posted, but I’m kind of… petite. Height-challenged. Runty. Low-profile. Diminutive.  Short, okay, I’m short.

Other shorties know the troubles I’ve seen.  Trying to discreetly jump to reach something on the top shelf in the grocery store, then finally having to ask for help.  Searching for “cute shoes that provide height yet remain comfortable”. (An urban myth, by the way). Having almost every piece of clothing altered. And standing-room concerts? Forget about it.

Studies tell us that taller people are more successful, more attractive, more happy.  Shorter people are supposed to be less accident-prone (yay?), but thanks to depth perception issues, I don’t benefit from that advantage either.  Pretty bleak, I know.  But changing your point of view can be simple: enter Gulliver’s Gate.



Gulliver's Gate Miniatures New York City - Mad Hatters NYC Blog
Brookfield Place’s atrium, including its giant palms
Gulliver's Gate Miniatures New York City - Mad Hatters NYC Blog
Miniature buildings call for miniature street art
Gulliver's Gate Miniatures New York City - Mad Hatters NYC Blog
Do you see the Hamilton billboard? Yup, still sold out.



Gulliver's Gate Miniatures New York City - Mad Hatters NYC Blog
A staff member tinkering with the models
Gulliver's Gate Miniatures New York City - Mad Hatters NYC Blog
The least crowded Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade you’ll ever attend

Located in the heart of Times Square, Gulliver’s Gate is a miniature model fan’s dream come true. And for a petite girl like me, it’s a fresh change in perspective.  Sprawled before me in a 50,000 sq ft space, there are miniature versions of my favorite New York City landmarks like the Brooklyn Bridge and the Chrysler Building.  Some newer additions to the skyline are also included, like the stunning Via 57 West building.  And miniature Times Square comes replete with its own Hamilton billboard (which we FINALLY got to see last month, you can find that post here).

For travel buffs, Gulliver’s Gate is a fun trip around the world — you’ll find recognizable structures from France, India, Russia, and more.  The project is the result of a collaboration between model-makers around the world, which leaves local touches throughout.  It’s also a little bit of a treasure map: you’ll have to look closely to uncover secrets.  Interactive features are built into the models for children (or curious adults that have trouble keeping their hands off things).  With a touch of a button, you can attend a Queen concert, or see the Loch Ness monster (and accompanying miniature paparazzi trying to photograph it), or send Santa off in his sleigh.  

Gulliver's Gate Miniatures New York City - Mad Hatters NYC Blog
Are there miniature copies of Hillary’s emails here?
Gulliver's Gate Miniatures New York City - Mad Hatters NYC Blog
Most of the figures in Mecca are in white, which is what men wear when completing the pilgrimage
Gulliver's Gate Miniatures New York City - Mad Hatters NYC Blog
The Grand Palace of Bangkok



Gulliver's Gate Miniatures New York City - Mad Hatters NYC Blog
The Chords Bridge in Jerusalem, which is illuminated with a blue light at night just as pictured
Gulliver's Gate Miniatures New York City - Mad Hatters NYC Blog
I maybe look kind of tall here, right?

But it’s not just models loaded with playful features, there’s tech too.  If you want to truly immerse yourself in this fantastical universe, you could get 3D-scanned in a giant orb and have miniature versions of yourself placed anywhere in the Gulliver’s Gate world.  Want to get to the top of the Aztec ruins without killing your thighs?  This is how.

Gulliver’s Gate is currently open for previews at a reduced admission rate through May 8.  There are a few incomplete displays but there is still much to see, and if you choose to return after the official launch your admission will be discounted.  This might be a great play if you have friends and family visiting later in the year and you know you’ll be back.  The miniature universe also plans to evolve, so there will continue to be new things to discover.  Visit the Gulliver’s Gate website for additional information and to purchase tickets.

Location:
216 W 44th Street

Hours:
Daily 9 am – 10 pm



Pair it with:

Brunch at Gotan

Gulliver's Gate Miniatures New York City - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Gulliver's Gate Miniatures New York City - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Gulliver's Gate Miniatures New York City - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

We’ve griped about food choices in Midtown many times before.  We regularly cry about chain restaurants and bitch about overpriced food.  So when we find a gem like Gotan, it’s truly something to celebrate.  

Gotan is located in Midtown proper, so we’re not even sending you on a little trek.  It’s a surprisingly large space, with bar seats up front and tables in the back.  The coffee is good (they serve Counter Culture, one of my favorites), and so is the food.  And guess what?  The weekend brunch here is a steal.  You heard me, a bargain brunch in Midtown.

If you order off the brunch menu, you’ll receive orange juice, coffee and an entree for under $14.  Or order off the a la carte menu, which is still reasonably priced.  The avocado toast and the breakfast plate hit the spot.

Location:
20 W 46th Street

Hours:
Mon – Thu 7 am – 5 pm
Fri 7 am – 4 pm
Sat 9 am – 3 pm

– L.

Raymond Pettibon: A Pen of All Work at the New Museum



I’ve been in a little bit of a rut lately.  Maybe it’s that last-bit-of-winter funk, or the fact that Justin and I recently both caught a nasty bug that knocked us off our feet.  But we’ve been opting for quieter weekends at home, leaving us scurrying to catch up with all the museum exhibitions we’d previously shortlisted.  One of those was A Pen of All Work by Raymond Pettibon at the New Museum.



Raymond Pettibon A Pen Of All Work New Museum - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Raymond Pettibon A Pen Of All Work New Museum - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

We vaguely knew Pettibon’s work from his time covering the Los Angeles punk scene, but we had no real concept of the breadth of his portfolio until we got there.  Hundreds of drawings occupy three floors of the museum.  Due to the sheer volume of work, the curators chose not to display the art chronologically, and most are without descriptive plaques.  Instead, the exhibition is organized thematically, with a floor dedicated to war and politics, and other sections depicting such widely varied subjects as baseball, surfing or cathedrals.  And don’t expect the displays to be linear, images are stacked above each other in random groupings, some are framed while others are tacked directly to the walls.  The erratic nature speaks to Pettibon’s style.

Pettibon was a fan of combining images with text, with some of the wording added years after the drawing or painting was complete.  The museum guide accurately warned that reading the text may not assist in understanding the art, but in fact, might create greater confusion.  

Raymond Pettibon A Pen Of All Work New Museum - Mad Hatters NYC Blog




Raymond Pettibon A Pen Of All Work New Museum - Mad Hatters NYC BlogRaymond Pettibon A Pen Of All Work New Museum - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Raymond Pettibon A Pen Of All Work New Museum - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Some people argue that great art should elicit a response without the need for explanation, but struggling to understand the work can be exhausting.  I vacillated between admiration and frustration, intrigue and confusion.  A great deal of inference and interpretation can be made, and that can be a rewarding experience if you connect with the art.  There was an obsessive nature and tinge of darkness that, admittedly, played to my current state of mind.  Many pieces were provocative, but the treatment of taboo subjects didn’t feel purposely sensational.  Pettibon is also a prolific artist, so his topical images take you on quite a historical trip.



Raymond Pettibon A Pen Of All Work New Museum - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Raymond Pettibon A Pen Of All Work New Museum - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

I’ll be the first to admit that the exhibition isn’t for everyone.  And I suspect that if I hadn’t been in a slightly melancholic and disconsolate state, perhaps my experience would have been quite different.  (Has that ever happened to you?)  But if you can appreciate a strong point of view and enjoy a little bit of tension in your art, then be sure to visit the New Museum before this ends.  

A Pen of All Work is on display through April 9.

Tip:  On Thursday evenings from 7 p.m.–9 p.m., admission is Pay-What-You-Wish.  Free docent tours are available on Wednesday and Friday: 12:30 p.m and Thursday, Saturday, and Sunday: 12:30 p.m. & 3 p.m.

Location:
235 Bowery

Hours:
Tuesday & Wednesday 11 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Thursday 11 a.m. – 9 p.m.
Friday–Sunday 11 a.m. – 6 p.m



Pair it with:

Lunch at Lighthouse Outpost

Raymond Pettibon A Pen Of All Work New Museum - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Raymond Pettibon A Pen Of All Work New Museum - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Raymond Pettibon A Pen Of All Work New Museum - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

There’s no shortage of fantastic eateries in Nolita, and we’ve probably covered a lot of them.  Most are popular, with a loyal brunch following waiting to fill the seats every weekend.  But once in awhile, you discover a stealth player that caters to the local in-the-know crowds.  Lighthouse Outpost is one of those places.

The original Lighthouse is situated in Williamsburg and offers seasonal, locally-sourced fare.  Lighthouse Outpost is its Manhattan footprint, taking up just a tiny space on Mulberry St that’s easy to miss.  There are only a few counter seats, so don’t plan a group lunch.  But whether you decide to eat in at the light-filled spot in the heart of Nolita or get your order to go, the options are excellent.  The shakshuka is always a winner, especially for a confessed egg lover.  The dry aged grass fed burger with jalapeno, sauteed onions, mayo, onion, cheddar and tomato offers just the right kick, but manages to leave virtually no greasy aftertaste.  But the veggie sides are the stars here: the cauliflower with egg, tahini and jalapeno was sublime.  A low-key Nolita lunch exists, and you’ll find it here.

Location:
241 Mulberry St

Hours:
Tuesday through Thursday 6 p.m. – 12 a.m.
Friday through Sunday 6 p.m. – 1 a.m.
Saturday through Sunday Brunch 12 p.m. – 4 p.m.

– L.

SPRING/BREAK Art Show during Armory Week



You know that saying about opinions and how everybody has one? Let’s be honest, you can probably say the same about blogs. There are so many out there, from personal blogs to those run by corporations and news outlets. Standing out is a challenging task. I’ll admit that when I meet new people I balk at mentioning the blog. It’s a part of ourselves out there for public consumption, and each post is an exercise in acceptance and rejection. Giving someone immediate access to that puts us in a vulnerable position.

But blogs are simply one of the many vessels of self-expression. Artists, since inception, have dedicated their lives to it. Acceptance and rejection are woven into the fabric of their existence, because their desire to create supersedes everything.  



SPRING/BREAK Art Show Armory Week - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Artist: Michael Zelehoski

SPRING/BREAK Art Show Armory Week - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Artist: Maisie Maeve Myfawnwy

The Armory Art Show is an annual art event in New York City that brings together hundreds of galleries from all over the world.  In one fell swoop, art lovers can view works from established names as well as up-and-coming talents in a variety of mediums.  After more than twenty years, the Armory Show now draws so many visitors that entire week is branded Armory Week and a variety of art events occur alongside the main event.  We decided to check out the SPRING/BREAK Art Show, which is a curator-driven art fair.  This year’s event was held in the heart of Times Square.

The SPRING/BREAK Art Show offers independent curators free exhibition space, but the curators are challenged to work within a theme and push artistic boundaries to the limit.  This year’s theme, Black Mirror, is “a looking glass meant for aesthetic reflection—a way to isolate a subject—once used by Old Masters in landscape painting and portraiture. The apparatus was used for seeing the world in its most basic attributes, enhancing some features, obscuring others.”   The show featured an astonishing breadth of work.  The artists each had a little room or space, and patrons, who subsidized the space with a small fee, could wander around the maze discovering all that was offered.

The artists at SPRING/BREAK are provided access to a large audience, with an opportunity to cultivate lifelong patronage.  But the experience must be unnerving, standing alone among a sea of exhibitors, struggling to stand out.  Art is so subjective, and some pieces resonated more strongly with us than others.  We’ve included a selection of what we saw in this post, and we’ll leave you to form your own opinions.  Let us know what you loved and hated in the comments below, or on Facebook, G+ and Instagram.

Artist: Nicholas Fraser

SPRING/BREAK Art Show Armory Week - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Artist: Greg Haberny
Also the artist of the featured picture

SPRING/BREAK Art Show Armory Week - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Artist: John Dilg



SPRING/BREAK Art Show Armory Week - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Artist: Tiffany Smith

SPRING/BREAK Art Show Armory Week - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Artist: Erin O’Keefe

SPRING/BREAK Art Show Armory Week - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

RHW Enterprises, performance art by multiple artists and performers



SPRING/BREAK Art Show Armory Week - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Artist: Michael Gittes

SPRING/BREAK Art Show Armory Week - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Artist: George Horner

SPRING/BREAK Art Show Armory Week - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Artists: Ori Carino and Benjamin Armas



Pair it with:

Brunch at Lalo

SPRING/BREAK Art Show Armory Week - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

SPRING/BREAK Art Show Armory Week - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Every once in awhile you come across a power couple that brings together two favorites that wouldn’t normally have seemed compatible, but somehow end up being a pretty great match.  No, I’m not talking about Blake and Gwen.  I’m talking about former El Rey chef Gerardo Gonzalez’s partnership with Dudley’s alums Mateusz Lilpop and Ben dos Remedios, which resulted in Lalo.

It’s still Mexi-Cali fare, though with a completely fresh perspective.  Case in point: there’s no avocado on the menu.  The coconut grits with 12-hour braised turnip was divine, as were the chilaquiles tacos and papas bravas.  The menu also features unique salads like the Cali “Kasha” Varnishkas with butter-toasted kasha, parsley, crimini mushrooms, onion agrodolce and farfalle, and inspired sides like the Cucumber in Brown Goddess, with mole, candied pumpkin seeds & mint.  

The avant garde menu is the perfect primer for a day at the art fair.  Or really, any day.

Location:
104 Bayard St

Hours:
Lunch Wed-Mon 11-4pm
Brunch Sat-Sun 11-4pm
Dinner Mon-Sun 6-12pm

– L.

Open House by Liz Glynn at Central Park



I remember when I first read and fell in love with The Great Gatsby, and I’m sure you do too.  Nick Carraway, Jay Gatsby and Daisy Buchanan captured our collective imaginations, and we continue to romanticize the period described so vividly by F. Scott Fitzgerald.  However, the term “Gilded Age” originates from Mark Twain’s book of the same name, which was a scathing commentary on the excesses of the time.  “Gilded Age” alluded to the shiny veneer that masked underlying poverty and social ills.  California artist Liz Glynn bring us a fresh interpretation of this juxtaposition in her latest piece, Open House, for the Public Art Fund.  




Open House Liz Glynn Central Park - Mad Hatters NYC Blog
William C. Whitney Mansion at 871 Fifth Avenue
Open House Liz Glynn Central Park - Mad Hatters NYC Blog
Ballroom of William C. Whitney Mansion, Illustration by James Lewis

At the southeast corner of Central Park in Doris C. Freedman Plaza, you’ll find reproductions of sofas, chairs, footstools and arches that once inhabited the William C. Whitney Ballroom.  William C. Whitney was an elite political figure and financier, and his luxurious home once sat at 871 Fifth Avenue.  The reproductions are from the period after the mansion was renovated by Stanford White in 1900.  But Open House artist Liz Glynn makes one small tweak in her reimagining: each piece is made out of concrete.  Concrete is a common building material, hence creating accessible versions of the opulent pieces.

Let’s sidebar for a second here.  Does the name Stanford White sound familiar?  Sure, he was a well-established architect and an equally prominent figure of the time.  But you’re more likely to remember that he was brutally murdered on the roof garden theater of Madison Square Garden in 1906 due to his scandalous relationship with a young model and actress.  We talked about that juicy morsel in our Flatiron post here.





Open House Liz Glynn Central Park - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Open House Liz Glynn Central Park - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Discussions of widening income inequalities, rising costs of living and a disappearing middle class are pervasive today.  While the issues exist everywhere, one could argue that the disparities can be more prominently felt in an expensive metropolis like New York City.  So Open House might feel particularly relevant in its little piece of Central Park.  Come out and grab a seat.  Rest your feet after a long park excursion.  Perch on a concrete sofa while you nosh on the crepe you bought from one of the food vendors nearby.  Or just hang out and watch the horses and traffic go by.  But come soon, it looks like the pigeons of New York City are already claiming parts of it for themselves.

Open House will be on display through September 24.

Location: 
Doris C. Freedman Plaza



Pair it with:

Dinner at Fowler & Wells

When we posted this picture on Instagram, our friend Saba noted that it was giving her Gatsby vibes, which mirrored our feelings exactly.  But it wasn’t a coincidence.  The building was originally built in 1881, when the Gilded Age was just blossoming.  The Beekman Hotel’s opening last fall was easily one of the most celebrated.  The atrium is enough to make you swoon, but the revamp is triumphant in that it gives one a sense of the borrowed past mingling ever so coyly with the present.  

Open House Liz Glynn Central Park - Mad Hatters NYC Blog
The stunning interior at Fowler & Wells
Open House Liz Glynn Central Park - Mad Hatters NYC Blog
The black bass and diver scallops entrees were scrumptious




Open House Liz Glynn Central Park - Mad Hatters NYC Blog
Don’t miss the amazing fluke appetizer
Open House Liz Glynn Central Park - Mad Hatters NYC Blog
Looking down on the warm and cozy Bar Room

You can enjoy drinks and snacks in the Bar Room, or splurge on a meal at Fowler & Wells.  Both are under the purview of Tom Colicchio.  But Fowler & Wells is his first new restaurant in Manhattan in six years.  The menu at Fowler & Wells is meant to replicate the marriage of old and new, featuring classics with a contemporary feel.  On our visit we found the dishes were executed to perfection, and the service was impeccable.  If you’re hankering to play Jay Gatsby for a day, this might be a great place to do it.

Location:
5 Beekman St

Hours:
Breakfast
6:30am – 10:30am, Monday – Friday & Sunday
6:30 – 11:30am, Saturday
Lunch
12:00pm – 3:00pm, Monday – Friday
Dinner
5:30pm – 10:00pm, Sunday – Wednesday
5:30pm – 11:00pm, Thursday – Saturday
Sunday Brunch
11:00am – 3:00pm

– L.

Central Park Ice Festival



I used to live in Cleveland and I used to smoke. Having a cigarette in downtown Cleveland in January is what one might call “peak winter”.  It’s what separates the smokers from the puffers, we used to joke.  (Not something we smokers should’ve been so proud of, I’ll admit.)  New York City winters are mostly mild by comparison, which is probably the only reason why I would turn to Justin and say, “Let’s go to the Ice Festival! That sounds like fun!”

The Ice Festival is an annual event organized by the Central Park Conservancy.  At the Naumburg Bandshell, park visitors are treated to a live, on-site carving by Okamoto Studio, a custom ice studio based out of Long Island.  The studio, a design collective originally founded by father-son team Takeo and Shintaro Okamoto, is known for working its magic with crystal clear ice.  Besides performing at previous festivals, Okamoto Studio has also lent its talents to Barney’s holiday windows and numerous private events.



Central Park Ice Festival - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Central Park Ice Festival - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

During the Ice Festival, the ice sculptors from Okamoto Studio are tasked with creating a replica of one of Central Park’s many bronze sculptures.  Last year’s event was cancelled due to inclement weather, so it was completely serendipitous that we finally made it out to the festival only to discover that this year’s replica was of the park’s Alice in Wonderland statue.  The bronze statue by José de Creeft was a gift by philanthropist George Delacorte, whose wife used to read the book to their children.  We obviously have our own attachment to Lewis Carroll’s tome.



Central Park Ice Festival - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Central Park Ice Festival - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Central Park Ice Festival - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

We arrived towards the later part of the event, after the sculptures had already been completed. At a balmy 45 degrees, the ice was melting pretty fast.  But the mild weather made the Silent Disco a hit, and we saw many getting down to the DJ’s tunes.  (On a funny note, a silent disco isn’t really silent:  most of its participants are singing to the music.)  It was a little crowded for our liking, but it’s no wonder why.  One couldn’t ask for a nicer winter evening to check out some art, sample some food truck fare, and then dance it all off in Central Park.  It’s the makings of a classic New York City adventure.



Pair it with:

Amorino

Central Park Ice Festival - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Central Park Ice Festival - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Now, I often wax poetic about how much I love this city, but you might be surprised to find out that I’m otherwise quite unromantic.  I despise Valentine’s Day and all the standard cliches that come with it.  Justin and I often laugh when my family texts to wish us Happy Anniversary because more often than not, we’ve forgotten.  We believe one has to be accountable in a relationship every single day, not once or twice a year.  I think volunteering to take out that really horrible, disgusting, ripe bag of trash says “I love you” more than a bouquet of roses.  BUT, if I were to ask for a rose, it would be one made out of ice cream.  

Ice cream roses have had their day (and then some!) on Instagram, and here it is, finally making an appearance on our blog.  I was introduced to Amorino by friends in London many years ago, and was thrilled to later discover it here in New York City.  It’s still one of my favorite gelato spots in the city.  And if I’m dressed for an Ice Festival, it means I probably have enough layers on to tackle a cone in the cold.  Winter be damned.

Multiple locations

– L.

Flatiron Walking Tour



Are you a fan of Serial? How about Making a Murderer? So are we. It seems all the best crime dramas are products of real life. So let us tell you about one that happened in our very own Flatiron district: the sensational murder of acclaimed American architect, Stanford White, by the wealthy Pittsburgh railroad heir, Harry Kendall Thaw.  All you have to do is step back in time to a little over a century ago.  1906, to be exact.

Stanford White was a wealthy, powerful man who maintained a bachelor pad”on 24th Street, just off Madison Square Park.  He was a serial womanizer, and a young model turned chorus girl, Evelyn, soon caught his eye.  White slowly gained the trust of her mother then convinced her to go on an all-expense-paid trip and leave Evelyn in his care.  During this period he drugged and raped the young Evelyn, then swore her to secrecy.  

Flatiron Walking Tour - Mad Hatters NYC Blog
The MetLife Tower was the tallest building in New York City from 1909-1913. The Woolworth Building knocked it off its top spot.



Flatiron Walking Tour - Mad Hatters NYC Blog
Part of the Admiral Farragut Monument. Farragut is known, among other things, for defeating Confederate forces and taking Mobile Bay where he uttered the immortal words: “Damn the torpedoes . . . full speed . . . ahead!”

White eventually moved on to greener pastures and Evelyn found a new suitor in Thaw.  Thaw proposed to Evelyn, but her sordid past prevented her from accepting.  He continued to push, and finally, Evelyn broke down and confessed the truth.  Thaw persisted in his proposals, so she eventually capitulated and became his wife despite his increasingly unstable behavior.  One evening in New York City, prior to attending opening night of a new musical, the married couple dined at a nearby restaurant and found themselves in the company of White.  Thaw became agitated, which continued throughout dinner and the show.  So when White showed up at the tail end of the performance, there on the rooftop of the original location of Madison Square Garden, Thaw marched up to him and shot him three times in the head.

The proceedings were dubbed “The Trial of the Century” since it included all the hallmarks of such a public spectacle: Wealth. Check. Influence. Check. Sex. Check. Insanity. Check. And, of course, murder. Check. Add to all that the rise of tabloid journalism, the first time a jury had to be sequestered and the first successful use of the insanity defense, and it’s just magic.

Flatiron Walking Tour - Mad Hatters NYC Blog
The Appellate Division Courthouse Beaux-Arts building, featuring historical, religious, and legendary lawgivers including Confucius and Moses.



Flatiron Walking Tour - Mad Hatters NYC Blog
Statue of William Seward, which is rumored to be Seward’s head added to an existing statue of Lincoln’s body because the employers ran out of funds

And who tipped us off to this true crime bonanza?  It was none other than Mike, our guide during the free walking tour offered through the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership Business Improvement District. That’s right, we said FREE.  The non-profit organization spearheads improvement projects, markets the area for business investment, maintains and increases value for residents and promotes the area to visitors.

Longtime tour guide, Mike Kaback, offered an immersive and passionate discourse on the history of the area and many of the surrounding buildings. Having lived in New York his entire life and worked for decades in the nearby Fashion District, Mike was a veritable trove of information. His love for the city and its rich history was undeniable, from the books he recommended to us for further reading to the scrapbook of notations and photos he carried along with him as he presided over the tour.

Free tours are offered weekly on Sunday at 11:00 am and meet at the southwest corner of Madison Square Park.  We covered the current art installation in the park here, but the tour will cover some of the other art fixtures, the buildings, and the rich history that comes with all of it.  

For additional information on the free Flatiron walking tours, visit the website here.  For additional tours by Mike, visit his website here.  

(And for more a really detailed account of the White murder, with great pictures and news clippings, visit Keith York City’s blog post about it here.  You know you want to.)



Pair it with:

Breakfast at Pondicheri

Flatiron Walking Tour - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Flatiron Walking Tour - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

As much as we love breakfast — and boy, do we! — the comfort and familiarity of the accustomed breakfast offerings occasionally feel a little Groundhog Day-ish. So that’s how we ended up at Pondicheri, the Houston transplant offering multi-regional Indian fusion cuisine.  Here, the omelet is made with “everything but the kitchen sink” and is available as a vegetarian or non-vegetarian dish.  The non-vegetarian version includes lamb keema, and it promises to wake you up with its curried spices and waves of flavor. If Indian food first thing in the morning makes you nervous, opt for one of their milder options, like the Green Dosa or the Beet Uttapam.  Vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free options are plentiful.  Why not try something different?

Location:
15 West 27th St

Hours:
Mon through Thurs 7:30 am – 10 pm
Friday 7:30 am – 10:30 pm
Saturday 9 am – 10:30 pm
Sunday 9 am – 10 pm

– L. and J.