TNT Supper Club presents Will at Vulture Festival 2017

One of the side effects of starting this blog is that our days off are now few and far between. But when we do take a day to relax, we often spend some part of it in front of the television, with our feet up and our hands reaching into a tub of snacks. It feels like our natural resting state. So when an event brings together television and food, we can’t say yes fast enough. TNT Supper Club did just that, and in a big way.



A Shakespeare for today

TNT Supper Club Presents Will at Vulture Festival - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

TNT Supper Club Presents Will at Vulture Festival - Mad Hatters NYC Blog



TNT Supper Club Presents Will at Vulture Festival - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

TNT Supper Club Presents Will at Vulture Festival - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

We attended the inaugural TNT Supper Club event as part of Vulture Festival, which is an annual weekend extravaganza that brings together all things pop culture.  (In case you missed it: Part One of our Vulture Festival experience involves Kevin Bacon.) To celebrate its new original series Will, TNT hosted a fabulous dinner at West Edge in the Meatpacking District. Will captures the life of a young William Shakespeare in London during the 1500s. If you’re flashing back to a boring English Lit class, or worse, Leonardo di Caprio playing Romeo, then you’re in for a surprise.

In Will, the young bard is in his twenties, and London’s theatre scene is exploding. It’s an exciting tale of fame and fortune, love and friendship, which we can all still relate to today. And a young, attractive cast doesn’t hurt. (They were among the guests at the dinner.)



Culinary poetry in motion

TNT Supper Club Presents Will at Vulture Festival - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

TNT Supper Club Presents Will at Vulture Festival - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

TNT Supper Club Presents Will at Vulture Festival - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Speaking of dinner, the multi-course feast that evening was presented by James Beard Award-winning chef Jamie Bissonette. With 16th century London as his inspiration, he developed a veritable feast that included appetizers like a divine Roasted Beet Salad and entrees like Curried Lamb Pie. The dessert, a Chocolate Pudding with ice cream and a crumble on top, was the stuff of dreams, so much so that Justin felt compelled to approach the congenial chef, shake his hand and offer his appreciation.

Perhaps what was most unexpectedly enjoyable about the evening was that we were seated at communal tables. This can make for an unbearably awkward evening, but fortune smiled upon us and we found ourselves meeting and dining with some lovely people. As they plied us with plates of polenta and turkey (and for those non-teetotalers, unlimited beer, cocktails and glasses of wine), we chatted about life, work, and, of course, the latest television shows we were catching up on. It made for an enjoyable evening all around.

Will premiers on TNT July 10.  

– L.

One Degree from Kevin Bacon at Vulture Festival 2017



We share New York City with a lot of celebrities, which means on any given day you might run into Jonathan Groff on his way to Hamilton (which I did!). Or you might find yourself waiting​ in line behind Famke Janssen for your takeout (which I also did!). And you might spy Michael K Williams in your subway car (yup, totally happened). I even walked by George Lucas on his way to Starbucks. (No judgment, George.)



One Degree from Kevin Bacon Vulture Festival 2017 - Mad Hatters NYC Blog
Image courtesy of Vulture Festival
One Degree from Kevin Bacon Vulture Festival 2017 - Mad Hatters NYC Blog
Image courtesy of Vulture Festival

It might be a little silly, but I read a long time ago that John Lennon loved how New Yorkers were always so relaxed around him. He captured that sentiment in the lyrics of his song, New York City:

Well nobody came to bug us,
hustle us or shove us
so we decided to make it
our home

So I always try to give the celebrities their privacy. I usually make crazy eyes at Justin to alert him (just so he can vouch for me when I tell the story), then furiously text all my friends. But bottling up my inner groupie is an effort. So once a year, I get pretty excited about letting my freak fangirl fly at the Vulture Festival.

We attended the Vulture Festival last year too, so you can read a little more about what it’s all about here. This year we had a couple of events lined up, the first of which was an interview with Kevin Bacon.  



One Degree from Kevin Bacon Vulture Festival 2017 - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Kevin Bacon and New York City

Kevin Bacon’s career has spanned many years and covers the stage, the small screen and the big screen. Everyone has a favorite Kevin Bacon movie, and because his range is so wide, it’s rarely the same one. He’s a die-hard New Yorker, and I’m not saying that because he’s lived here since the age of 17. When asked about his favorite restaurants, he refused to divulge them because then they would get crowded.  Classic New Yorker move.



One Degree from Kevin Bacon Vulture Festival 2017 - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

One Degree from Kevin Bacon Vulture Festival 2017 - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Kevin Bacon and Fame

The interview was refreshingly conversational, and Kevin Bacon was surprisingly real. He talked honestly about fame: “There are two types of actors: the ones who want to be famous, and liars.” He confessed that when he achieved fame, he struggled with the fact that it wasn’t for what he wanted to be famous for. There was an anecdote about how he felt starring in Tremors (a favorite of Justin’s, it just so happens) wasn’t something he fully appreciated at the time. But he has since changed his opinion, so much so that he’s currently developing a television series based upon it. He’s funny too: he joked about not having enough coke to pick girls up at Studio 54, and nepotism on this latest project (it was directed by his wife, starred him and his daughter and was scored by his son).

Vulture Festival calls itself a “pop culture extravaganza”, which might come off as a little bombastic. But these kind of up close and personal experiences are pretty hard to beat, and the talent keeps getting better each year (Neil Patrick Harris! Sarah Jessica Parker!). All event attendees also had access to their lounge, which featured amazing eats, live music and DJs throughout both days.

If you’re a fan of pop culture, there’s really no event like it. Stay tuned for Part Two of our experience there later this week. And Los Angeles take note: Vulture Festival is coming to you this November for the first time!

– L.

Sisterhood of the Traveling Storytellers: An Introduction to New York City Bloggers



There is a Confucius quote that says:

 “True wisdom is knowing what you don’t know.”  

Shortly after we started blogging we realized what we didn’t know could fill an ocean.  It’s been a journey, one we explored more thoroughly in our year-end review after our first full year of blogging.  But we’ve received a lot of help and inspiration along the way, and no small part of that has come from other New York City bloggers that we’ve been fortunate to become acquainted with.  

NYC Bloggers Introduction - Mad Hatters NYC Blog
This is what we were going for…
NYC Bloggers Introduction - Mad Hatters NYC Blog
Nailed it, amirite? 🙂  From L-R: Lynn and Justin (that’s us!), Jess of Used York City, Becca of Tea with B, Mary Lane of New York Cliche, Mary of Mary in Manhattan, Trudy of Rendezvous in New York

We recently had the opportunity to finally put faces to blog names, and get to know some of our peers.  We were happy to discover that they are as effervescent in person as their blogs are, and we thought we’d introduce them to our readers the best way we know how: by comparing them to food.



New York Cliche = Mozzarella Pizza from Joe’s Pizza

NYC Bloggers Introduction - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

NYC Bloggers Introduction - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Mary Lane is the blogger behind New York Cliche.  She takes all the typical trappings of life in the big city and puts her fun spin on it.  Like Joe’s Pizza, it’s a cliche, yes, but it’s also classic.  It’s a seasoned favorite that stands the test of time.

Mary in Manhattan = French Fries from Pommes Frites

NYC Bloggers Introduction - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

NYC Bloggers Introduction - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Mary is the blogger behind Mary in Manhattan, and she’s every budget-conscious New Yorker’s BFF.  Like Pommes Frites, she proves that enjoying life in the city doesn’t require a platinum card, just a ton of creativity.  Stay in your comfort zone and dip your fries in Barbecue sauce.  Or explore the exotic and dip your fries in Pomegrenate Teriyaki Mayo.



Used York City = Chicken Matzo Ball Soup from Mile End Deli

NYC Bloggers Introduction - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

NYC Bloggers Introduction - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Jess is the mastermind behind Used York City, a site that features the work of several New York City writers as well as her own.  Like the Chicken Matzo Ball Soup at Mile End Deli, Used York City is practical without being mundane. It’s a familiar resource you’ll turn to on a regular basis.

Rendezvous en New York = Ice Cream from Ample Hills Creamery

NYC Bloggers Introduction - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

NYC Bloggers Introduction - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Trudy is the blogger behind Rendezvous en New York.  Like Ample Hills, Trudy is a mix master, covering a variety of topics on her blog.  Ample Hills throws together marshmallow and rice krispies, or Ritz crackers, potato chips, pretzels and mini M&Ms.  Trudy throws out posts on food, art and local sights.  It’s an eclectic amalgamation of the things she loves. 



Tea with B = Specialty Croissants from Union Fare

NYC Bloggers Introduction - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

NYC Bloggers Introduction - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Becca is the blogger behind Tea with B, which is a blog with a slightly misleading name.  Although Becca does indeed cover tea, her blog also includes beauty, food and a host of lifestyle topics.  Like Union Fare’s specialty croissants, which include flavors like Fruity Pebbles, Matcha and Birthday Cake, Becca offers multiple on-trend flavors to suit any palate.  

And although she couldn’t make brunch, we wanted to also mention Julianne of It’s Five Here.  Hers is a fun blog that covers the bar scene in New York City as well as travels around the world.

If you’re like us, you’ve consumed, and will continue to consume these blogs (and their food equivalents!), on a regular basis.  If you’re a New York City blogger interested in attending the next meet-up, please reach out to us:
Email: letschat@madhattersnyc.com
Or on social media: FB, G+, Instagram, Twitter (yes, we just started on Twitter, come and say hi!)

Enjoy!

– L. & J.

Human Interest at the Whitney Museum of American Art



While we cringe every time we hear someone refer to themselves as a “brand”, it’s impossible to deny that nowadays people sell. Celebrity can arise as much from a book one labored on for five years as a viral video one shot in five seconds. Sometimes we fail to comprehend the attention, but then there are numerous articles calling the Mona Lisa overrated. (Google it.) Portraits are depictions of people, and what makes them uniquely engaging is there are at least two people involved: the artist and the subject. The subject could be attractive, the artist could be notorious, and the relationship between the two could be scandalous. People never fail to intrigue.




Human Interest Whitney Museum - Mad Hatters NYC Blog
Untitled by Rudolf Stingel
Human Interest Whitney Museum - Mad Hatters NYC Blog
Varese by Alexander Calder

Art itself, each individual piece, is always subject to personal taste.  But there’s also the curator: the visionary selecting those pieces and bringing them together to form an exhibition.  A great curator can make all the difference.  You may find a painting by a particular artist that speaks to your very soul, but his body of work may reveal a hallmark style or experimental techniques that inspire quite the opposite.  Human Interest: Portraits from the Whitney’s Collection offers both incredible individual pieces and inspired collective thematics. With 200 works, presented in the form of 11 thematic sections and covering the entire 6th and 7th floor of the Whitney Museum’s magnificent interior, the exhibit delivers a vast compendium of the art’s oldest genres spanning from the 1900s to the present day.

Of all of the sections, New York Portrait, located on the 7th floor, piqued our interest.  In particular, Lever Building II, the graphic painting and collage by Idelle Weber, circa 1970.  Though we couldn’t locate any reference citing it as an inspiration, Steve Fuller and Mark Gardner’s iconic title sequence for Mad Men seemed too eerily similar to claim as mere coincidence.  George Tooker’s surreal painting, The Subway, circa 1950, using egg tempera — a Renaissance-era technique creating a smooth, matte surface — is reminiscent of a carnival funhouse mirror, perfectly capturing the alienation and isolation of contemporary urban life.

Human Interest Whitney Museum - Mad Hatters NYC Blog
Lever Building II by Idelle Weber
Human Interest Whitney Museum - Mad Hatters NYC Blog
Ethel Scull 36 times by Andy Warhol
Human Interest Whitney Museum - Mad Hatters NYC Blog
Woman and Bicycle by Willem de Kooning
Human Interest Whitney Museum - Mad Hatters NYC Blog
Parody of de Kooning’s Woman and Bicycle by Peter Saul

Meanwhile, Howard Kanovitz’s mesmerizing New Yorkers I, circa 1965, employs the brilliant use of shadow swirling around men in suits and ties, with only the grid of a window offering a view of the wider city outside.  And of course, there’s Susan Hall’s New York Portrait, in which the grid lines of a provocatively transparent dress worn by a woman with casual boldness as she reclines in a chair merge with the same grid pattern of an enormous window revealing the skyscrapers beyond.  Each portrait reflects the city as its subject, its inhabitants simply representations or settings.

Our continued obsession with Humans of New York and This American Life, among others, proves that we all desire, in one way or another, to get to know the other people who inhabit our world.  We want to learn their stories, and here, at the Whitney Museum, there are so many being told.  Come and see for yourselves.

Human Interest: Portraits from the Whitney’s Collection is on display through February 12.

Location:
99 Gansevoort St

Hours:
Mondays 10:30 am–6 pm
Tuesdays Closed
Wednesdays 10:30 am–6 pm
Thursdays 10:30 am–6 pm
Fridays 10:30 am–10 pm
Saturdays 10:30 am–10 pm
Sundays 10:30 am–6 pm



Pair it with:

Brunch at Bubby’s

Human Interest Whitney Museum - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Human Interest Whitney Museum - Mad Hatters NYC Blog

Bubby’s offers “American” fare, which all too often is the euphemism for generic Cracker Barrel-type places.  But not at Bubby’s.  Bubby’s interprets “American” the way we wish everyone in America would: by taking into account ethnic diversity as well as contributions from all across the plains.  As stated on their website, “American cuisine is much more than burgers and pie; it’s Chinese, Mexican, Southern, an elaborate and flavorful food scape created by the generations of people who built America.”  

And it started as a pie shop.  You know how much we love pie.

So pop into Bubby’s High Line location, which is located across the street from the Whitney, and partake in some comfort food.  You’ll find Meiller’s Farm beef in the Double Bubby Burger and Anson Mills grits in the Cheddar Grits Breakfast.  Wear a flag pin, it feels right.

P.S.  This location has an Ample Hills Creamery attached to it.  Just sayin’.

Location:
73 Gansevoort St

Hours:
Sunday – Thursday 8 am–10 pm
Friday and Saturday 8 am–12 am

– L. and J.