Pizza Moses Leads Us To The Promised Land: A Slice of Brooklyn Bus Tour



When A Slice of Brooklyn invited us to check out their Pizza Tour, we thought two things: 1) How have we not done this yet? and 2) Do we have to take the L train?

It turns out we didn’t. *Insert enormous sigh of relief here* Continue reading Pizza Moses Leads Us To The Promised Land: A Slice of Brooklyn Bus Tour

It’s a Small World After All: A Visit to Gulliver’s Gate



I’m not sure if you can tell from the pictures we’ve posted, but I’m kind of… petite. Height-challenged. Runty. Low-profile. Diminutive.  Short, okay, I’m short.

Other shorties know the troubles I’ve seen.  Trying to discreetly jump to reach something on the top shelf in the grocery store, then finally having to ask for help.  Searching for “cute shoes that provide height yet remain comfortable”. (An urban myth, by the way). Having almost every piece of clothing altered. And standing-room concerts? Forget about it.

Continue reading It’s a Small World After All: A Visit to Gulliver’s Gate

Four Score and Seven Years Overdue: Our Visit to Hamilton on Broadway



In the summer of 2007, while Justin and I were still living in Phoenix, we made our annual pilgrimage to New York City with great anticipation.  Our trips always included an ambitious list of restaurants to tackle, as well as a sampling of plays and musicals.  That summer, we were excited to check out an Off-Broadway production we had read about called In The Heights.  

At the 37 Arts Theater in Hell’s Kitchen (since renamed the Baryshnikov Arts Center), we were seated in the second row, close enough to see the beads of sweat on the performers’ faces and watch the spit escape from their lips.  It was everything we’d hoped it would be: exciting, fresh, funny, captivating.  We were so enamored with the performance that we waited after the show to speak to the creator, a young upstart named Lin-Manuel Miranda.  But there was no one else waiting, and we questioned ourselves.  Was this not done?  Were we not supposed to approach the cast?  We suddenly felt starkly like out-of-towners, clueless about the lay of the land.  He exited the theater, and we lost our nerve.  We stood there and watched him go by. Continue reading Four Score and Seven Years Overdue: Our Visit to Hamilton on Broadway

Unique New York City Experiences: A visit to NYC Icon Russ & Daughters



We’re pretty unabashed brunchaholics.  We register an abnormal amount of excitement when a well-regarded restaurant moves from serving dinner only to offering brunch.  We’ve got a Google Map with a list of restaurants that we’ve saved, with enough potential suitors to secure a weekend brunch schedule through 2050.  But our favorite thing to do AFTER brunch?  Head over to Russ & Daughters to pick up bagels, cream cheese, smoked fish and any other number of goodies so we can have a second brunch for dinner.

Don’t judge.

We can’t possibly be alone, because when you step in there on a weekend, it’s packed to the gills.  (Hey, did I just pun?)   Continue reading Unique New York City Experiences: A visit to NYC Icon Russ & Daughters

Breaking Bread NYC: Raising a Fork and Awareness



“May we borrow a cup of sugar?”  I know, it’s a tad idyllic. And it’s certainly an anachronism in today’s introverted, disconnected world. But once upon a time, perhaps more recently than you can imagine, this concept was commonplace. You might recall recently hearing about Chris Salvatore and Norma Cook, a 31-year old actor and his 89-year old neighbor who were in the news when they became unlikely roommates (RIP, Norma). But there was a time when this wouldn’t have made headlines. We regularly reached out to those in our communities, shared provisions, broke bread together, attended to the elderly, and shouldered the burden of raising children. We knew our long-standing neighbors, welcomed newcomers and even stayed in touch with those who moved away.

I was pondering this recently, somewhat abstractly, while watching a movie on Netflix. It’s called Today’s Special, and I happened upon it during one of those all-too-frequent occurrences when I simply couldn’t find anything that struck my fancy. And I’ll admit, I juuuust about scrolled past it.

Today’s Special didn’t win any major awards. There were no flashy actors (though there were some incredible veteran players in the ensemble cast). It’s a simple, somewhat cliché story. But it embodies some beautiful ideals. It’s a New York story. It’s an immigrant story. It’s a story about cuisine, family, identity and love. And it’s a story that resonates with me, particularly in light of recent events. Continue reading Breaking Bread NYC: Raising a Fork and Awareness

Flatiron Walking Tour



Are you a fan of Serial? How about Making a Murderer? So are we. It seems all the best crime dramas are products of real life. So let us tell you about one that happened in our very own Flatiron district: the sensational murder of acclaimed American architect, Stanford White, by the wealthy Pittsburgh railroad heir, Harry Kendall Thaw.  All you have to do is step back in time to a little over a century ago.  1906, to be exact.

Continue reading Flatiron Walking Tour

Tourist for a Day: A Visit to Rockefeller Center


True story: a few years ago on a late December evening, we arrived in Grand Central after visiting with some friends in Connecticut.  We needed to pick up desserts for a friend’s party and Bouchon Bakery was a favorite, so we thought we’d make a quick run to Rockefeller Center.  Well, we collided with the holiday-loving mob, and it took us an hour to navigate the tiny Plaza.  So now, like all other New Yorkers, we avoid Rockefeller Center in December.  

Continue reading Tourist for a Day: A Visit to Rockefeller Center

Chuck Close at the 2nd Avenue Subway



If you were introduced to twenty people but you could only identify them using their social security numbers, how many would you be able to pick out of a crowd the next day? If you’re like me, probably zero. That’s kind of what it’s like to have prosopagnosia, or face blindness. Facial features become a mess of details that you just can’t remember. That’s pretty fascinating, right? And you know what’s even more fascinating? Chuck Close, the renowned portrait artist, suffers from it. Continue reading Chuck Close at the 2nd Avenue Subway

It’s 3.142 O’clock Somewhere: An Ode to the Best Pie in New York City


Pie is home. Pie is comfort and consistency, when life is anything but. I’ll take pie in any form: the crimped-edge, single-crusted oculus splendor, the vented double-crusted surprise, and even the lowly hand pie, with all the adult pop-tart binge baggage that comes along with it. And sure there’s a dark side to this obsession. My penchant for flaky crusts and sweet fillings has lead to undesirable trips to the tailor (I’m talking to you, skinny jeans), a couple of “I don’t feel so good” upset stomach moments, some unintentional excitement in the dentist’s chair (though causality or correlation has yet to be substantiated to my satisfaction), and innumerable half-hearted New Year’s resolutions.

Continue reading It’s 3.142 O’clock Somewhere: An Ode to the Best Pie in New York City

Tourist for a Day: A Visit to Battery Park



Every once in awhile, Conde Nast Traveler or some other travel magazine will publish an article on “How To Not Look Like a Tourist”.  And without fail, it leads to a spirited discussion in the comments section and on social media.  It’s not difficult to understand this ambivalence towards tourists.  New York City received approximately 58 million visitors last year, and locals simply have to accept that it’s a part of city life.  Yes, you’ll encounter those five tourists who decide to walk side-by-side and take up an entire sidewalk. But 2014 statistics show that visitors generated a record $61.3 billion in overall economic impact, supporting 359,000 tourism related jobs and $21 billion in wages. Continue reading Tourist for a Day: A Visit to Battery Park