Zoolander 2, Kiehl’s and the DZCFPWDAG



Living in New York City is not without its challenges: sky-high rents, overcrowding and a consistently manic pace. But those who suffer it do so for the trade-offs: great art, great food and great entertainment. Besides its 8 million residents, visitors also pass through here in droves, making it a great market for… just about anything. Enter Zoolander 2 and Kiehl’s cross-promotional stunt: The Derek Zoolander Center for People Who Don’t Age Good (or DZCFPWDAG to those in the know). Continue reading Zoolander 2, Kiehl’s and the DZCFPWDAG

Heart of Hearts in Times Square

When I was young, my father would take us to these book warehouse sales, where mostly outdated and oddball titles were peddled on the cheap. On one of those trips, I stumbled upon a book about the zodiac which introduced me to the world of astrology. The notion that the supermarket clerk and I could share similar traits based on our birthdates captured my juvenile attention, and when I reached the section with compatibility charts, I quickly looked up the only couple whose birthdays I knew: my parents. Appalled by my findings, I rushed over to my mother and exclaimed “You shouldn’t have married Dad! You’re not compatible!” My mother calmly replied, “If you’re not compatible with someone it doesn’t mean you can’t marry him, it just means the two of you might have to work harder.” Continue reading Heart of Hearts in Times Square

Building Tour at New York Public Library



“Please, no…Wait! Wait! Wait!” I shouted at the top of my lungs, slapping the side of the bus with enough force that the bones in my hand would gradually stiffen and the skin of my palm would radiate a dull, throbbing ember of pain late into the evening. In New York City (or anywhere else, for that matter), bus drivers don’t have a reputation for being especially empathetic creatures. Maybe it’s the nature of the job: long hours, miserable passengers, impossible traffic and a lot of repetition. But the driver of this particular bus—the final one to depart from the gate at ten o’clock—must have won twenty bucks on a scratch-off or had the weekend off, because instead of tightening his sphincter and stomping on the accelerator, he applied pressure to the brakes. And so began the silver lining at the end of a brutal week of work that would extend from the long commute home and through the weekend to come. Continue reading Building Tour at New York Public Library

Fairy Tale Fashion at the Museum at FIT

Growing up as a fashion-crazed girl in Malaysia was like being a bread lover with celiac’s.  So when I moved to the United States to go to college, I couldn’t wait to indulge my fashion proclivities.  I happily rocked plaid miniskirts with matching sweaters a la Clueless (I realize I’m probably dating myself here), when one day I overheard a classmate snidely remark, “So nice of her to dress up for class.”  Then I started working, and the whole idea of an office wardrobe beckoned, so inspired by the power suits of Dynasty and Working Girl (okay, dating myself again here), I enthusiastically traded my plaid miniskirts and sweaters in for pencil skirts and tailored jackets.  A colleague rolled her eyes and stated, “I don’t understand why people dress up for work.”   Continue reading Fairy Tale Fashion at the Museum at FIT

Sculpture Garden Mornings at MoMa

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When MoMa made the decision to allow free access to its Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Sculpture Garden in September 2013, the decision drew quite a bit of ire.  In this New York Times article from February 2014, Robin Progrebin asserts that the move was “partly to help mitigate its widely unpopular decision to demolish a neighbor, the former American Folk Art Museum, as part of its expansion.”  Complaints included the fact that the half-acre courtyard wasn’t designed to accommodate large crowds, and that congestion would eliminate the refuge the garden was intended to provide.  Additional concerns about maintaining the space’s integrity were voiced in Architect Magazine. Continue reading Sculpture Garden Mornings at MoMa

Manhattan Adirondacks

You weave through the throngs of people, the red, blinking hand taunting you in the distance.  When you finally make it to the street corner, the red hand is stationary and the cabs are leaping out of their lanes towards you. You jump back onto the sidewalk to safety, barely avoiding the murky puddle at your feet, when some unidentifiable cloud of smoke wafts up from the sewer grate and hits you in the face.  Maybe it’s time for a getaway. Continue reading Manhattan Adirondacks

The Curious Case of the Hess Triangle (or something to see on the way to dinner)

“Hey, hey, easy kids. Everybody in the car. Boat leaves in two minutes… or perhaps you don’t want to see the second largest ball of twine on the face of the earth, which is only four short hours away?”

-Clark Griswold, National Lampoons Vacation

Continue reading The Curious Case of the Hess Triangle (or something to see on the way to dinner)

Holiday Window Displays

New York City can really get its holiday game on.  We are home to the 80-foot tree at Rockefeller Center as well as the world’s largest menorah.  And for those of us who pray to the Gods of Retail, we have the holiday display windows.  It’s seasonal art at its best, and often involves collaborations with designers from far and wide.  For a greatest-hits walking tour that most everyone should be able to manage (or tolerate, depending on who you’re with), we recommend the following route: Continue reading Holiday Window Displays

Lowline Lab

 

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Love the High Line?  Well, did you know that someone is trying to build its underground cousin?  After reading this article, we decided to head down to the Lowline Lab to check it out.  The intended location of the park will be a couple of blocks away (and much bigger) but visiting the lab gives you a lot of interesting information on the science behind the project and a preview of what could be.  There are many volunteers present to answer questions, but based on our conversations with them, it’s clear that the project is still in VERY early stages.  It’s still fun as a quick outing if you’re in the neighborhood, or really into flora and fauna.

Location:
140 Essex Street
(between Rivington and Stanton Streets)
Lower East Side – New York City
Subway: J/M/F Essex Delancey Street

Hours:
Saturday and Sunday
10am – 4pm
Free and Open to the Public
October 2015- March 2016

For more information, visit their website.

Pair it with:

Brunch at Dirt Candy

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So you dropped a fiver in the donation jar at the Lowline Lab and you’re feeling one with Mother Nature, why not continue on to Dirt Candy, a phenomenal vegetarian restaurant located less than a half mile away.  The food is amazing even if you’re not a vegetarian, but don’t take our word for it.  Check out the full review by one of our favorite food sites here.

Location:
86 Allen Street
(between Grand and Broome Streets)

Open for brunch from 11:30am – 2:30pm on Saturdays and Sundays

Tip: For some odd reason, Dirt Candy is always busy when they first open for brunch so there’s often a wait, but if you go around 1:00-1:30pm after the initial rush has died down, you can get seated immediately.

For more information, visit their website.

– L.