Open House New York Weekend

Every October, Open House New York Weekend offers extraordinary access to some of New York City’s most iconic buildings. Many of these sites are off-limits to the public throughout the year.

Open House New York (known by its acronym, OHNY) allows participants to meet the people who design, build, and preserve New York City. The focus is simple: deepen participants’ understanding and appreciation of architecture and urban design. Simultaneously, it seeks to open dialogue about planning, preservation, infrastructure, and contemporary design that will impact the city far into the future.

OHNY Weekend offers two types of access: open and reserved. Open access sites are available to everyone, though there may be hours restrictions. Reserved sites only offer access limited to only those with reservations. Sites range from historical to contemporary and residential to industrial across all five New York City boroughs.

Open House New York Weekend visits may include tours, talks, performances, and other special events throughout the weekend.

Mark your calendars for two very important dates. On October 1st 2019, during “The Big Reveal”, the full lineup of more than 300 sites is released to the public. Then, on October 7th, reservations are open to the public at 11:00 pm EST.

Remember, ten’s of thousands of visitors attend OHNY each year, so tickets can go very quick. Don’t miss your chance to get in on the fun and explore the city in a whole new way.

Check dates, times, and participating locations, as well as make reservations for limited access sites here.

For a comprehensive guide to Open House New York, check out our post here.

Photoville Presented by United Photo Industries

Now in its 7th year, Photoville is the largest annual photographic event in New York City. Free and open to the public (all ages and pet-friendly), this immersive photography festival presented by United Photo Industries showcases the work of over 600 visual artists, in conjunction with over 100 curatorial partners, and offers photographers of all stripes the opportunity to come together and interact with a large, diverse audience.

Some of the Photoville’s highlights include nighttime projection programs, hands-on workshops, an eduction day for New York City middle and high school students, panel discussions and talks, tents with vendors, family-friendly photo activities, publishers and gear demonstrations, a community photo book store, tintype portraits, and a beer garden with a range of food vendors supported by Smorgasburg and Brooklyn Brewery.

As in previous years, Photoville will be located in Brooklyn Bridge Park in DUMBO, transforming Brooklyn Bridge Plaza into an incredible modular galleries consisting of a network of more than 65 re-purposed shipping containers.

If you’re looking for the inside scoop, check out our post on last year’s Photoville here.

You can find general information about Photoville here, including directions, FAQ, and hours of operation.

Photoville Presented by United Photo Industries

Now in its 7th year, Photoville is the largest annual photographic event in New York City. Free and open to the public (all ages and pet-friendly), this immersive photography festival presented by United Photo Industries showcases the work of over 600 visual artists, in conjunction with over 100 curatorial partners, and offers photographers of all stripes the opportunity to come together and interact with a large, diverse audience.

Some of the Photoville’s highlights include nighttime projection programs, hands-on workshops, an eduction day for New York City middle and high school students, panel discussions and talks, tents with vendors, family-friendly photo activities, publishers and gear demonstrations, a community photo book store, tintype portraits, and a beer garden with a range of food vendors supported by Smorgasburg and Brooklyn Brewery.

As in previous years, Photoville will be located in Brooklyn Bridge Park in DUMBO, transforming Brooklyn Bridge Plaza into an incredible modular galleries consisting of a network of more than 65 re-purposed shipping containers.

If you’re looking for the inside scoop, check out our post on last year’s Photoville here.

You can find general information about Photoville here, including directions, FAQ, and hours of operation.

 

Sculpture Garden Mornings at MoMa

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When MoMa made the decision to allow free access to its Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Sculpture Garden in September 2013, the decision drew quite a bit of ire.  In this New York Times article from February 2014, Robin Progrebin asserts that the move was “partly to help mitigate its widely unpopular decision to demolish a neighbor, the former American Folk Art Museum, as part of its expansion.”  Complaints included the fact that the half-acre courtyard wasn’t designed to accommodate large crowds, and that congestion would eliminate the refuge the garden was intended to provide.  Additional concerns about maintaining the space’s integrity were voiced in Architect Magazine. Continue reading Sculpture Garden Mornings at MoMa

Lowline Lab

 

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Love the High Line?  Well, did you know that someone is trying to build its underground cousin?  After reading this article, we decided to head down to the Lowline Lab to check it out.  The intended location of the park will be a couple of blocks away (and much bigger) but visiting the lab gives you a lot of interesting information on the science behind the project and a preview of what could be.  There are many volunteers present to answer questions, but based on our conversations with them, it’s clear that the project is still in VERY early stages.  It’s still fun as a quick outing if you’re in the neighborhood, or really into flora and fauna.

Location:
140 Essex Street
(between Rivington and Stanton Streets)
Lower East Side – New York City
Subway: J/M/F Essex Delancey Street

Hours:
Saturday and Sunday
10am – 4pm
Free and Open to the Public
October 2015- March 2016

For more information, visit their website.

Pair it with:

Brunch at Dirt Candy

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So you dropped a fiver in the donation jar at the Lowline Lab and you’re feeling one with Mother Nature, why not continue on to Dirt Candy, a phenomenal vegetarian restaurant located less than a half mile away.  The food is amazing even if you’re not a vegetarian, but don’t take our word for it.  Check out the full review by one of our favorite food sites here.

Location:
86 Allen Street
(between Grand and Broome Streets)

Open for brunch from 11:30am – 2:30pm on Saturdays and Sundays

Tip: For some odd reason, Dirt Candy is always busy when they first open for brunch so there’s often a wait, but if you go around 1:00-1:30pm after the initial rush has died down, you can get seated immediately.

For more information, visit their website.

– L.